Cyclist airlifted from Warwickshire crash

ambo4

Thursday 19th December 2013 – 2.20pm – Claire Brown.

A cyclist has been seriously injured in a road traffic collision in a Warwickshire village this morning.

West Midlands Ambulance Service was called to reports of a collision involving a cyclist and a lorry outside the Wharf Inn Pub on Wharf Road, Fenny Compton, Southam, at around 10.30am today (Thursday).

An ambulance, a paramedic area support officer and the Warwickshire and Northamptonshire Air Ambulance with a doctor on board attended the scene.

A West Midlands Ambulance Service spokeswoman said: “Crews were told a lorry had been in collision with a cyclist. The cyclist, a man believed to be in his 70s, had been thrown from his bike and was lying in the road but was conscious and breathing.

“Upon assessment, ambulance crews found he had suffered a nasty fracture to his right foot and suspected fractures to his left leg. The man was administered pain relief before being immobilised with leg splints, a neck collar and a spinal board. He was airlifted to University Hospital Coventry and Warwickshire for further assessment and treatment.

“Luckily, the man was wearing a cycle helmet which reduced the chances of more serious or even fatal injuries.”

 

ENDS

Written by officialwmas

West Midlands Ambulance Service (WMAS) covers a geographical area of approximately 5,000 square miles and serves a population of 5.6 million people living in Shropshire, Herefordshire, Worcestershire, Coventry & Warwickshire, Staffordshire and the Birmingham & the Black Country conurbation. The Trust has a total number of 4000 members of staff and uses 864 vehicles.

6 comments

    1. Thank you for your comments.

      The reason that we issued that statement was because of something said to us by the crew who attended who clearly believed that the helmet saved the patient from more serious injury.

      In general terms, I have spoken to many ambulance staff on this subject. I have yet to find one who does not advocate wearing one. One told me at length of a case where the rider’s helmet was in two pieces, but their head was thankfully not. They also told me of horrific head injuries sustained by riders who were not wearing a helmet; one who was not involved in a collision with a vehicle but who hit his head on a tree stump.

      In regard to your second point, we agree entirely that all road users should be mindful of each other. We raised that very point on Wednesday after a near miss.

      I hope that the above comments are helpful and thank you again for your message.

      MM

  1. I cannot possibly see what it is relevant to mention fact that the man was wearing a cycle helmet in this story. His injuries were ‘a nasty fracture to his right foot and suspected fractures to his left leg’, can you explain how wearing a helmet helped? This is just another example of helmet promotion for the sake of it – yet it is common knowledge that helmets are not designed to protect cyclists from impacts with motorised vehicles. Also, Accident Advice helpline research shows that 2 of the top 5 injuries to car passengers and drivers in collisions are to the head and brain. If you’re going to mention cycle helmets for no other reason other than to blatantly promote them, you should be doing the same in any instances where motorists or car passengers are admitted with injuries following collisions.

    1. Thank you for your comments.

      The reason that we issued that statement was because of something said to us by the crew who attended who clearly believed that the helmet saved the patient from more serious injury. They were there and so we went with their comments.

      In general terms, I have spoken to many ambulance staff on this subject. I have yet to find one who does not advocate wearing one. One told me at length of a case where the rider’s helmet was in two pieces, but their head was thankfully not. They also told me of horrific head injuries sustained by riders who were not wearing a helmet; one who was not involved in a collision with a vehicle but who hit his head on a tree stump.

      We regularly raise the issue of all road users being mindful of each other. Indeed, we made that very point on Wednesday after a near miss.

      I hope that the above comments are helpful and thank you again for your message.

      MM

  2. I agree with the other comments. Also, why don’t you mention helmets when pedestrians are run over by motor vehicles?

    It’s also interesting to note that the safest country to ride a bicycle in is also the country with the lowest rate of helmet wearing.

    1. Thanks for your comment Mark. I hope you have been able to see the other comments that we have made. In regard to your thoughts on cycling in Holland, there is no doubt that the majority do not wear helmets, though when I was there is the summer cycling there seemed to be many more than previously. However, there is a massive difference between cycling in Holland and cycling in the UK. Firstly, cyclists are King – cars and pedestrians give way to cyclists. Secondly, the number of cycle routes is huge. Even when there isn’t one which is completely separate to the road, there is a big wide strip that cars do not go into.

      At the end of the day, it is up to the individual as to whether they wear a helmet or not. From the comments of our staff who go out to treat those who have come off their bike, for whatever reason, there is an almost unanimous view that people should wear one. We are merely passing on that view and then it is over to you.

      Hope this helps and Merry Christmas.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s